A Revolution You Can Eat At

By Rob Wipond

We’re pretty conspicuous when we pull up in a little silver hatchback covered with children’s paintings of carrots, flowers, and slogans like “be cool, grow veggies,” sporting a roof rack piled with enough hay bales to practically tip us over.

Nevertheless, it’s hard for me to shake the feeling we’re sneaking around like criminals. Surely we’re not supposed to be in other people’s backyards when they’re not home. Even if they said we could.

So it’s a new way of experiencing my city as we pull weeds, lay compost, roll a seeder, and harvest strawberries, nasturtiums and lettuce in yards in Victoria, Saanich and Oak Bay.

I’m urban farming with Sol Kinnis, co-owner of City Harvest. It’s part of an international movement in revitalizing food production in cities informed by organic and SPIN (small plot intensive) agricultural methods. Others do similar projects locally, like Donald Street Farms, LifeCycles, and Gorge Tillicum Urban Farmers, but with 12 loaned yards City Harvest is the largest, and co-owners Kinnis, Sharon McGeorge, and Heather Parker are the only urban farmers in BC attempting to create a financially viable co-operative company.

We break for lunch outside Parker’s own home with a half-acre yard hosting planting areas, beehives, toolsheds, greenhouse, and cold storage. Kinnis and Parker’s respective children play nearby, pets romp, volunteers and people working in exchange for room and board come and go, and I feel part of a warmly vibrant extended farm family—on Haultain Street.

Jo-Anne Lee, I’ll soon learn, has similar feelings. This women’s studies professor, who’s loaned City Harvest her Oak Bay yard, waxes on about supporting alternative economies and democratic, co-operative enterprises which provide opportunities for mothers “to have an integrated work-life balance,” but then laughingly concedes her real motives are “less theoretical than that.”

“I had this big yard that was way too much for me to manage,” she says. “Having somebody come in to garden…was just a gift.” Lee loves to turn from her computer and see people bringing her yard to life on a sunny day, then leaving her vegetables. She also enjoys feeling more vitally connected to her community. “It’s kind of neat to think that something grown in your backyard is going to find its way to a local market or restaurant…To be in that cycle, in that network.”

Read more at RobWipond.com

One response to “A Revolution You Can Eat At

  1. Pingback: Seafood kinnis | Selfimage

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