Tag Archives: colorado

The Permaculture Movement Grows From Underground

Claudia Joseph's Brooklyn classrom Credit: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times

By Michael Tortorello
New York Times

As a way to save the world, digging a ditch next to a hillock of sheep dung would seem to be a modest start. Granted, the ditch was not just a ditch. It was meant to be a “swale,” an earthwork for slowing the flow of water down a slope on a hobby farm in western Wisconsin.

And the trenchers, far from being day laborers, had paid $1,300 to $1,500 for the privilege of working their spades on a cement-skied Tuesday morning in late June.

Fourteen of us had assembled to learn permaculture, a simple system for designing sustainable human settlements, restoring soil, planting year-round food landscapes, conserving water, redirecting the waste stream, forming more companionable communities and, if everything went according to plan, turning the earth’s looming resource crisis into a new age of happiness.

It was going to have to be a pretty awesome ditch.

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Colorado town considers food sovereignty while promoting its reality

By John Colson
Post Independent

Summertime visitors to Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale will likely see at least one of these four working in the school's gardens. The gardeners, from left, are Bryan Cronan of Atlanta, Casey Bowen of Littleton, CRMS garden program director Linda Halloran of Carbondale, and Katherine Johnson of Oakland, Calif. They expect to grow about 12,000 pounds of fruits and vegetables this year.

Summertime visitors to Colorado Rocky Mountain School in Carbondale will likely see at least one of these four working in the school’s gardens. The gardeners, from left, are Bryan Cronan of Atlanta, Casey Bowen of Littleton, CRMS garden program director Linda Halloran of Carbondale, and Katherine Johnson of Oakland, Calif. They expect to grow about 12,000 pounds of fruits and vegetables this year. (Kelley Cox / Post Independent)

CARBONDALE, Colorado — Some healthy-food activists in the area believe the time is right for local communities to declare their “food sovereignty” from federal food safety regulations and corporate food production and marketing.

They see it as a way of encouraging the production and consumption of locally grown produce, dairy products, meats and more, which advocates say is critical to the survival of individual humans and society at large.

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